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Four Spring Residential Torsion Systems

Friday, August 11th, 2017 at 3:49 pm by Dan Musick

Many years ago when we first posted our residential torsion spring database program, we discovered customers were ordering longer life springs that were so heavy that the shaft would bend from the extra weight.

Because of this we began recommending that customers add idler support brackets if either of their springs weighs over 20 pounds.

And, as could be expected, longer life spring orders for heavier doors weighing 30 pounds or more required different solutions. The more common is to install two solid shafts with a cast iron connecting coupler in addition to the idler brackets. With the additional shipping this solution costs an additional $300-400.

A less expensive option that costs less than $50 is to convert a two spring system to a four spring system using smaller springs. Rather than install idler support brackets customers can install spring anchor brackets, such as our more popular SAB-450K.

Here, the two center springs are mounted as before. The two outer springs mount to what would have been idler brackets. The difference is that these brackets include the extra bolts and nuts for attaching the stationary cones to the brackets. Both springs to the left of the center support bracket are right wind; the two springs to the right are left wind.

One problem with converting to four springs can be limited shaft space. When calculating the space needed for the springs, first measure the distance between the drums. The wound springs, cones and brackets need to fit inside this space.

Next, determine the wound length of each spring. On 1 3/4″ and 2″ springs the cones for each spring require 2.25.” Add to this the width of the coils you add when winding the spring. On standard seven foot high doors figure eight coils and multiply this by the wire size. For example, 41.75″ X .2253 = 1.8.” Hence, 2.25″ for the cones + 41.75″ for the length of the spring + 1.8″ of turns = 45.8.” Add to this the gaps between the coils on the cones which is sometimes as much as 1/2.” Figure an additional 1/8″ for the thickness of the bracket.

This Wound Torsion Spring Lengths Spreadsheet may come in handy.

If there is not enough space on the shaft, you can always increase the inside diameter of your springs. If you have 1 3/4″ ID springs you can easily convert to 2″ because all the bolt holes are the same. If you have 2″ ID springs you can convert to 2 5/8″ ID and use the same brackets if the bolt holes are slotted. This torsion spring inside diameter converter should help.

 

New Page & Software for EZ-Set Torsion Springs

Friday, August 4th, 2017 at 5:40 pm by Dan Musick

In order to help our customers find the correct springs for their garage doors, we just posted our revised page with new software to make it easier to purchase Clopay, Ideal and Holmes EZ-Set Springs.

In the past we encouraged do-it-yourselfers to measure the springs, but because of gaps between the coils and because of the coatings on the springs, the wire size was often difficult to determine.

Now customers can order by manufacturer and model number. In our most recent blog we showed how to identify Clopay, Ideal and Holmes door by model numbers on the stickers.

If this information cannot be found, we have an additional tab for selecting a spring or springs by door weight. Customers have found our instructions for how to weigh a garage door helpful.

If you have any questions please contact us.

 

Warehouse Manager & Personnel Manager Wed

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016 at 1:53 pm by Dan Musick

Way to go, Neal and Jorie! Congratulations! We wish you all the best as you begin your lives together.

Neal and Jorie, October 21, 2016.

Neal has been a huge help since we were working out of our garage not many years ago; now he has his hands full with a large warehouse full of parts to inventory and ship.

Jorie has helped us part time since September of 2015 as she has finished her education and prepared for her wedding. She’s been a tremendous help performing a variety of skills, including the completion of our first employee handbook and helping us set up employee reviews. She’s also advised us on a number of other personnel issues.

She’s a great worker and she would be a valuable asset for a larger company who can use someone full time with her education and skills. In May of 2016 she received her Master of Arts degree in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Elmhurst College. You can discover more about Jorie in her resume.

Cubs Win!

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016 at 7:35 am by Dan Musick

Way to go, Cubs!

2016 World Champions!

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Spring Is Here! A Few Checks Are In Order

Monday, March 8th, 2010 at 4:08 pm by Jim

Garage door buckes can be corrected

Meteorological Spring made its glorious arrival this past Monday, and Daylight Saving Time will kick in next Sunday the 14th.  What kind of winter has it been around your house?

With garage doors getting a workout all winter in the “car protection” mode, it is possible that you may find a few pieces of hardware (screws, nuts, bolts) strewn on  the front half of your garage floor.  After picking them up to avoid a flat tire, have a look around on the door to see where they came from.  If you can’t make out from where, how is the garage door functioning lately?  Run a cycle on the door and watch.  If you observe buckling or strange noises while in travel, you may need a low-involvement repair.  Call Dan at DDM and get confidence, with knowledgeable advice.

This advice may necessitate a repair, or simply a lubrication.  But if you get it addressed now, you can save trouble and expense down the road.  Have a GREAT spring!

(Warning:  As always, be careful around garage doors and their parts, and call a professional for the work if you have any doubt about your ability to service them safely).