Dan's Garage Door Blog

Finding a Reputable Garage Door Repair Company

Friday, July 14th, 2017 at 2:58 pm by Andrew Koetters

DDM Garage Doors is a retail garage door parts company, but sometimes customers contact us for help getting their doors professionally repaired. What is the best way to find a reputable garage door repair company? Here are some suggestions.

 

Check Online Reviews

Online sources can help you determine what fellow consumers are saying about prospective service companies.

Yelp®, Facebook®, Google™ Reviews – Social media is helpful because you will find honest and thorough reviews directly from customers and their personal experience. But beware of false reviews posted by greedy competitors or by the companies themselves, trying to create a false image. Here’s one posted by Tommy a while back to discourage customers from buying from us.

Better Business Bureau® (BBB®) – The BBB is helpful for a verified, accurate, and professional rating of a company. A BBB accredited business and the accompanying rating is based on customer reviews, filed and resolved complaints, time in business, and known business practices. If a company is an accredited business and boasts a B+ or better rating, you can be pretty sure that they will treat their customers fairly and honestly. Do realize, however, that many A+ rated companies are rated high only because there was a problem requiring the customer to contact the BBB. A satisfactory settlement will restore a company to the A+ rating. Better companies will settle problems before the customer has to go to the BBB to resolve the difference.

Ripoff Report® – A lesser known service, but extremely helpful, the Ripoff Report is a good last search to make sure there are not major complaints against a company. This source is where you will find any major negative reviews or rip-offs from a certain company.

 

Look Out for Bad Business Practices

A good test of a reputable company is how they treat their customers, and if they operate their business in an honest, fair, and trustworthy manner. If a company tries something that just doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t, and you’re probably not the first customer to suspect the company is not reputable.

Not keeping appointments – A reputable company will do everything they can to honor their appointment, and if they cannot make it on time, they will let you know. If you have a scheduled service time of 1-3 PM, and they show up at six, they probably don’t value their customers’ time and schedules like they should.

Drastic Increases to Quoted Service – Honest businesses will always try to give their customers the best price, and the most accurate quote based on the service requested. If the charge varies they notify the customer before performing the work. Beware of those who stiff customers with the classic bait and switch technique.

Up-selling Parts – When it comes to garage door repairs, only the broken or damaged parts need to be replaced. There are some situations where parts have been discontinued and parts need to be upgraded. If the cost varies from the quoted price this should not be done without first notifying the customer. There are other times when the door and opener need standard routine maintenance, but beware when companies insist you change more of the parts than you need.

 

 

 

 

 

Garage Door Noise

Friday, July 7th, 2017 at 3:41 pm by Andrew Koetters

Ultimately, every garage door opener will make noise. It’s impossible to get something as large and as heavy as a garage door to be whisper quiet. In earlier decades it didn’t matter because many garages were detached, but in the last 20-25 years most single family homes have been built with attached garages. As a result bedrooms are often above the garage, and living rooms are beside the garage separated with just a wall. Each week we get a number of requests from customers who would like to reduce the noise coming from their garage doors.

To get rid of noise, first determine whether it is coming from the door or the opener. Disengage the opener from the door and then open and close the door manually. If you don’t hear the noise when doing this, the opener is the source of the noise. Otherwise the noise is probably coming from the door.

Here are a few suggestions for quieting your door.

 

Lubricating the Door

One easy way to eliminate noise from the door is to lubricate all the moving parts. End bearings, center bearings, springs, hinges, and rollers can all make noise. We recommend using a spray lubricant designed for garage doors, 3-IN-ONE® oil, or non-detergent motor oil such as 10W30 or 5W30. Do not use WD-40® as that acts more like a cleaner and it actually removes the existing lubrication.

Also, if you have dry torsion springs do not lubricate the last five coils on each end. If oil gets under the coils the spring can come loose causing it to unwind and the door to fall if it is open. This tutorial should help:

 

Installing Nylon Rollers

Another way to quiet the door is to replace the existing steel rollers with nylon rollers. Most doors ship from the factory with steel rollers. The main source of noise with these is steel wheels rolling on the steel tracks. This noise can be reduced some by adding a small amount of oil on the horizontal tracks, and lubricating the wheels of the rollers, but ultimately steel on steel will make some noise.

The alternative is to install nylon rollers. These can be found on our rollers page. The nylon rollers are more expensive than steel rollers, but reducing the noise may be worth the higher cost. We often get questions regarding durability of nylon verses steel rollers. Our 11-ball nylon rollers last as long as the standard 10-ball steel rollers, but beware of cheap plastic rollers. They appear to be similar to the higher quality nylon rollers, but many do not have ball bearings, and they wear down quickly. Many do have the ball bearing rollers, but they fall apart after only a few years. This tutorial should be helpful if you would like to install new nylon rollers to quiet your door:

 

Reducing Opener Noise

The final potential source of noise is the garage door opener. Whether new or old, there is always a certain amount of hum and vibration from the motor. This noise is especially loud above the garage, as the vibration travels up the mounting angle and through the ceiling to the floor above. The best solution we’ve found is to hang the opener from the angle with bungee cords. You want to use shorter, stronger bungee cords to make sure there isn’t too much stretch. Ideally you should use two bungee cords, one to hang the opener, and then one going around the bottom of the opener body in order to support it and eliminate any side to side movement.

It’s also possible for the opener to create higher pitched squeaks or grinding noises, as in this Sears opener with a worn bushing. Two of the more common noises include stripped gears in Chamberlain / Sears Craftsman / Liftmaster openers.

We also see a lot of stripped trolleys on Genie screw drive openers. Other causes include a lack of grease on the internal gears and bushings, a lack of oil on the chain if you have a chain drive opener, or lack of grease on a screw-drive opener. For any sort of squeaking or grinding noise, make sure you check the opener for proper lubrication, and be sure to use only the grease recommended by the manufacturer.

 

Business Philosophy

Friday, June 30th, 2017 at 2:00 pm by Dan Musick

There are not seven nor 10 nor fifteen ingredients for success. There are thousands and one mistake can torpedo a business.

One important ingredient for the Christian in business is to honor God. In the book of Proverbs the wisest man who ever lived prescribes timeless principles for success and failure in business as well as in your personal lives.

In short, obey God and you succeed; disobey him and you fail. Cause and Effect. This applies to the sale of garage door parts and anything else that can be bought and sold.

No where in the history of mankind is this principle explained more clearly than when the nation of Israel was about to enter the promised land.

Blessings:
“So it shall be, when the Lord your God brings you into the land of which He swore to your fathers, to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to give you large and beautiful cities which you did not build, houses full of all good things, which you did not fill, hewn-out wells which you did not dig, vineyards and olive trees which you did not plant — when you have eaten and are full — then beware, lest you forget the Lord who brought you out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage.” (Deut. 6:10-12)

Curses:
“But it shall come to pass, if you do not obey the voice of the Lord your God, to observe carefully all His commandments and His statutes which I command you today, that all these curses will come upon you and overtake you. . . You shall betroth a wife, but another man shall lie with her; you shall build a house, but you shall not dwell in it; you shall plant a vineyard, but shall not gather its grapes. Your ox shall be slaughtered before your eyes, but you shall not eat of it; your donkey shall be violently taken away from before you, and shall not be restored to you; your sheep shall be given to your enemies, and you shall have no one to rescue them. Your sons and your daughters shall be given to another people, and your eyes shall look and fail with longing for them all day long; and there shall be no strength in your hand. A nation whom you have not known shall eat the fruit of your land and the produce of your labor, and you shall be only oppressed and crushed continually. So you shall be driven mad because of the sight which your eyes see.” (Deut. 28:1, 30-34 – All verese are from the NKJV.)

At DDM Garage Doors we take God’s promises and warnings seriously.

Blessings!

 

Garage Door Sales

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017 at 4:17 pm by Dan Musick

DDM Garage Doors no longer sells garage doors outside of the Chicagoland area. In the past we built wood crates for shipping garage doors over the road. We recently stopped doing this because the $500-$1,000 freight costs were often as much as the price of the door itself.

We also tried shipping doors through the Amarr dealer network; the closest regional Amarr warehouse would deliver doors directly to our customers. We stopped doing that due to frequent complications regarding door features, lead time, and shipping details.

If you are still interested in purchasing a door, and if you are outside the Chicagoland area, we suggest you try a local Lowes, Menards or Home Depot. Their prices are reasonable, but you may have to wait a few weeks for the order. Sometimes local mom-and-pop stores have the door you need at even better prices. There are also a few companies that sell doors on line.

Sometimes it’s better to bite the bullet and hire a professional installer. From past experience we have found that an installing company can better size your opening and provide the best door for your application. I’ve never been impressed with the advice I’ve gotten at home centers.

 

High Lift Kit FAQ

Friday, June 16th, 2017 at 1:27 pm by Andrew Koetters

 

1: How much does a high lift kit cost?

A custom high lift from DDM typically costs $200 – $350 when an operator is not included and $600 – $750 when an operator is included. In addition to the kit cost, expect shipping costs of $50 – $100, sometimes more if the kit is pre-assembled or includes extra hardware. Note: these price ranges are estimates, NOT guarantees.

 

2: How long does it take to receive the high lift kit?

On average, DDM receives 20-25 high lift inquiries every week. When we receive an inquiry, we look it over and judge based on our 35 years of experience whether there are any measurements or specs of concern. We will often contact customers if something looks unusual so as to confirm that we have all of the correct information. If the measurements are reasonable and the customer contacts us soon after receiving the email quote, the turn-around time can be as quick as 1-2 days. Once the kit ships from our warehouse, shipping time within the lower 48 states is usually 1-4 business days. Expect longer transit time for Hawaii/Alaska, or if shipping internationally.

 

3: How high can I mount my high lift assembly?

Our custom high lift program designs each high lift assembly with the shaft mounted four inches away from the ceiling and jamb. This is to allow sufficient space for the standard high lift cable drum which has an outer diameter of almost 6”. This will place your horizontal tracks 7.75” – 8.75” away from the ceiling. On assemblies with more than 54” of high lift, the horizontal tracks will be closer to 10” away from the ceiling because even larger drums are required. In reality, the tracks can usually extend another inch or two without any problem, but we cannot guarantee the door will operate without issue.

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2016/01/11/high-lift-how-high-can-i-go/

 

4: What does it mean to have a “balanced door”?

A “balanced door” is one which stays on the floor when closed, remains at rest when in the middle of its travel, and stays up when opened fully. This will be the case if you have the correct springs that are wound the correct number of turns. If your springs are correct but you still have problems balancing the door, you can usually adjust the springs accordingly, up to ½ turn in either direction. If you still have balance issues, check the cable timing on the drum. On a high lift assembly with the correct cables installed, the cable should begin wrapping on the flat portion of the drum as the top roller of the door begins rolling on the horizontal tracks. If your cable does not perform this way, then the cable is either too short or it was improperly installed.

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2015/11/03/a-balanced-garage-door/

 

5: Can I reuse the springs from my previous application?

Most customers understand that standard length cables will need to be changed out for longer cables on a high lift assembly, but it’s a common misconception that the springs can be reused. Because the vertical portion of the door travel is now extended, there is not an immediate weight offload into the horizontal tracks. Additional turns are needed on the springs to account for the extra distance and extra stationary weight (see question 6). However, simply applying more turns to your current springs will not work because then the force of the springs will be too great when the door is in the closed position, and it will not close all the way. Instead, you need to purchase springs which are specifically sized for the new setup.

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2015/11/12/common-high-lift-problems/

 

6: Why do high lift systems require more turns on the springs?

When the door is in the open position on a standard lift setup almost 100% of the door weight is sitting in the horizontal tracks. This allows the springs to be almost fully unwound, with about ½ turn on the springs just to hold tension on the cables. Once a high lift kit is installed and the tracks are modified, the door will still only open to just past the opening. Instead of sitting fully horizontal, a portion of the door will be held in a vertical position. Therefore, a percentage of the door weight still needs to be held by the springs. The new larger springs, requiring additional turns, hold this extra weight. Depending on the amount of high lift installed, it could be as much as 2-4 extra full turns. This is also a reason that the previous springs cannot be reused (see question 5).

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2015/12/11/how-many-turns-do-you-wind-a-torsion-spring/

 

7: Can I reuse the drums from my previous application?

You cannot reuse your old drums. Due to the longer vertical travel in a high lift assembly, the resting weight of the door will stay constant for the first few feet of travel. But as soon as the springs start unwinding they begin to lose force. The tapered ends of the high lift drums account for this by proportionally decreasing the moment arm as the springs unwind and thus helping the door stay balanced throughout this vertical extension. The flat portion of the high lift drum is then used as the weight of the door is offloaded into the remaining horizontal track (see question 4). Standard lift cable drums are completely flat and therefore the moment arm doesn’t change.

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2015/11/12/common-high-lift-problems/

 

8: Why is my track extension shorter than the inches of high lift?

A common point of confusion for high lift customers is the fact that the track they are adding to the vertical (track extension) does not seem to reach the ceiling. In reality there are two dimensions, the length of the track extension, and the inches of high lift. The “inches of high lift” (see photo above) is the distance between the top of the closed door and centerline of the horizontal track, as a flat plane. Therefore, even standard lift systems technically have a few “inches of high lift.” The vertical track extension just adds to this dimension, placing the tracks as close as possible to the ceiling. The track extension simply adds to the inches of high lift, it is not equal to it.

 

9: I purchased a high lift kit in the last few years. Why are my cables fraying?

Back in 2015 we came across an issue with the high lift cable drums having rough edges. These rough edges were left by seams in the molds used for casting these drums. While the rough edges do not compromise the drums in any way, over time the installed cables can get worn down and start fraying. We have been working with customers that purchased high lift kits during this time to get the cables replaced and to fix the drums to avoid future issues. The rough edges can be ground down with a hand file or angle grinder and the drums can still be used without issue. We now make sure to grind down the rough edges of the drums before they are shipped out with a kit. Please contact us if you still run into this fraying problem.

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2015/11/16/rough-edges-on-high-lift-drums/

 

10: Is a vertical lift a good alternative to a high lift?

The appropriate answer is “Which one do you need?” While high lift doors rise a given distance vertically before entering the horizontal tracks, vertical lift doors rise vertically for their entire travel. These doors do not require horizontal tracks because they rest above the door opening and “parallel” to the jamb. A vertical lift is typically the better option when there is sufficient ceiling height within the garage. Minimum ceiling height for a vertical lift is double the door height, i.e. 14’ ceiling for a 7’ tall door, etc. If the space is available, a vertical lift is a good long term option to allow maximum space for lighting, workshop equipment, or storage.

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2011/10/13/vertical-lift-a-good-alternative-to-high-lift-garage-door/

 

11. How do I keep the windows from scraping the stop molding?

Because the door will no longer pitch immediately into the track radius as it opens, the track for a door with windows may require adjustment so as to avoid scraping the glass against the PVC stop molding or header. If you have windows installed on the door, in order to avoid the need for adjustment after installation, select the option in our high lift inquiry form that you have an outside lock or handle that you want to keep. This will provide the added pitch you need.

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2016/02/08/gaps-on-high-lift-doors-with-windows/

 

12: What if I have low headroom tracks currently?

If you have low headroom tracks currently but sufficient headroom for a high lift assembly, the tracks can be modified to fit the high lift assembly using the parts we provide. You will need to separate the two track pieces in order to reuse the lower horizontal track and radius. We will provide the standard horizontal track angle to connect the track to the high lift angle. You will probably need to replace the top and bottom fixtures as well.

http://ddmgaragedoors.com/blog/2016/03/15/converting-from-double-low-headroom-tracks-to-high-lift/  

 

 

Stewardship

Friday, June 9th, 2017 at 6:02 pm by Dan Musick

When my three kids were young I was struggling with ordering my life of family, business, church work and leisure time. I approached a fellow church member, Bill Pollard, for advice. He had successfully grown Service Master. I asked how to establish priorities. He replied, “You know, Dan, in the original English the word ‘priority’ occurred only in the singular.” Christ first, and everything else is ordered by that one priority.

He also made a statement that has been an integral part of building this business. “I don’t own my business, my family, or anything else. God owns it all. I am just a steward of all He’s entrusted to me.”

Learning to operate as a faithful steward requires a lifetime. It follows totally different goal setting and planning.

Stewardship opens the door to incredible opportunities. Most businesses operate on the basis of untempered, myopic greed. Even well-established core values and five, ten and lifetime goals can blind one to greater missed opportunities.

Stewardship demands evaluating and seizing the daily opportunities that cross our paths, some that will create instant results, some that will be left for the next generation. Leaving opportunities for others is good stewardship.

Good stewardship also recognizes God’s perspective on our lives. American society devalues age; God sees the treasures of the experience he has provided and expects stewardship of these life experiences. For example, the brawny 20 something year old who can build a house by himself later learns to hire others to build many more houses than he could build by himself. That’s stewardship.

Tragically, in America we’ve lost the value of our aging population, the rich wells from which great treasures can be drawn. This devaluation has also become part of the psyche of the American workforce. This defective perspective impacts hiring decisions and it hurts the self image of our aging population. “Who would hire someone in their 50’s with 35 years of experience?” I’m sure I’ve heard this from at least 100 men.

The truth is that as we gain knowledge and experience we always have more, and we become more, no matter the age. Wisdom and faithful stewardship takes responsibility for multiplying all that God has entrusted to us. May we all “succeed” in being found faithful.

When are leaf bumpers and push down bumper springs necessary?

Friday, June 2nd, 2017 at 11:48 am by Andrew Koetters

Leaf bumpers or push down bumper springs are recommended for use on residential standard lift applications when using a jackshaft opener, as well as certain commercial applications.

Normally, if space allows, a standard overhead rail type opener is used for standard lift systems. These openers pull/push on the door directly to raise and lower it. If more overhead space is required, or you desire a nice “clean” look, a jackshaft opener can be used. This type of opener mounts on the header, and raises/lowers the door by driving the torsion spring shaft directly. For residential systems, we recommend the Liftmaster 8500.  This opener is designed and mainly used on high lift assemblies, but with the proper steps, can be used on a standard lift system.

When using this opener with standard lift tracks, the spring bumpers are necessary to ensure safe operation. This is because jackshaft openers rely on the door weight to keep tension on the cable.  These bumpers mount to the back of the horizontal tracks and provide forward/downward force on the door when it is in the horizontal tracks.

 

If the door is in the up position with minimal weight pulling down, there is a slight risk of the opener turning the shaft, the door not moving, and the cable unwinding off the drum. There is then nothing to stop the door from crashing to the floor and causing damage or injury to anything or anyone in its way. To counter this, the bumpers provide constant force pushing the door down from the back, which should keep the cable taught.

The recommend Liftmaster 8500 opener comes standard with a cable tension monitor for safety. A common question we get from customers is whether or not the cable tension monitor on the jackshaft will be sufficient to stop the opener, and hold the door if the cables were to go slack. Generally, this should work, but we do not recommend relying on it 100%. The spring bumpers are relatively cheap insurance to guarantee that the door will work properly and safely.

If you are interested in using a jackshaft operator on your standard lift door, we suggest using these spring bumpers in order to prevent property damage or serious injury.

 

Clopay Pinchproof – The Downside to Unique Hardware

Friday, May 26th, 2017 at 1:00 pm by Andrew Koetters

Just recently, Clopay stopped manufacturing the hinges for their specially designed Pinch Proof doors. One of the most common models to use Pinch Proof hinges is the model 150S (commonly found in the western U.S.). These pinch proof doors were originally developed in the 1980’s to protect against damaging fingers and other foreign objects that could potentially get caught between the door sections. Although some manufacturers had already developed other “Pinch-Proof-type” options, the designers of the Clopay Pinch Proof system sought to create a simpler design that both professional and DIY installers and repairmen can understand. Despite the attempt to develop an option that was both safe and fairly intuitive, these hinges were constructed with cheap steel and have been known to break at a high rate. This is not necessarily the reason why Clopay manufacturers discontinued the part, but it is certainly a disadvantage of the design. Here is a sampling of the Pinchproof hardware:

 

If you have a Pinch Proof door and one of your hinges has broken, you are left with only a few options:

  1. You may be able to find a company that still has these hinges in stock. At DDM, we still have a number of #0 and #4 Pinch Proof hinges in stock, but we no longer have any #1, #2, or #3 hinges. The pins and covers for these hinges are also still available on our website. Because of the nature of the Pinch Proof system, you cannot simply apply one of the standard hinges that we offer. Instead of placing the pivot point directly at the point of separation between the panels, the pivot point of the Pinch Proof hinges are below the point of separation between panels. Refer to the patent drawings below.
  2. You may be able to have a local metal fabrication or machine shop repair the hinge. It may work for a short time, but it will only function as a temporary repair.
  3. Regardless of your initial course of action, you will ultimately be faced with the third option: to purchase a new door. We recommend choosing a door that is designed for and uses standard hardware.

 


Sources below*


While specially manufactured systems like the Clopay Pinch Proof doors may provide a number of benefits for customers, this does not make them inherently “better” than doors with standard hardware. Seeing as the parts for these specially designed systems are often not interchangeable with standard hardware, the manufacturers of such parts offer very few options for customers once the parts are discontinued. Although DDM Garage Doors sells specially manufactured parts such as the Clopay Pinchproof, Wayne Dalton, and Amarr hardware, we generally recommend using systems which have standard hardware.

 

 

*United States Patent and Trademark Office – U.S. Patent 6,006,817

http://pdfpiw.uspto.gov/.piw?PageNum=5&docid=06006817&IDKey=EEC703709CED&HomeUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fpatft.uspto.gov%2Fnetacgi%2Fnph-Parser%3FSect2%3DPTO1%2526Sect2%3DHITOFF%2526p%3D1%2526u%3D%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html%2526r%3D1%2526f%3DG%2526l%3D50%2526d%3DPALL%2526S1%3D6006817.PN.%2526OS%3DPN%2F6006817%2526RS%3DPN%2F6006817

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect2=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=/netahtml/PTO/search-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&d=PALL&RefSrch=yes&Query=PN/6006817

 

Solid or Hollow Stop Molding?

Friday, May 19th, 2017 at 1:00 pm by Andrew Koetters

In the garage door industry two different types of PVC stop molding are used – solid and hollow. So which one is better?

At DDM Garage Doors we have kept both the solid and the hollow stop molding pieces as stock items for as long as we’ve been in business. Recently we decided to discontinue the hollow stop molding, and for one simple reason – our customers prefer the solid pieces. The shape, size, and material are all about the same for both, but there are some key differences that impact installation and use.

Even though both types are made of a PVC material, the hollow stop molding is more rigid and brittle than the solid. Being less flexible makes the hollow stop molding vulnerable to breaking when bent, whether during storage, or when handled before installation. Furthermore, the hollow stops are extremely susceptible to cracking during installation, especially when there is a stray hit from a hammer. This problem is even more likely to occur when installing the stop molding in cold weather because hollow PVC is more brittle.

The main advantage to the hollow stop molding has always been the fact it costs less, but is this slight savings worth it? Based on what we have seen over the years customers prefer solid molding over the hollow, which is just a small fraction of the total stop molding sales.

At DDM Garage Doors we endeavor to provide our customers with the best possible product, and we believe that the solid PVC stop molding is the superior choice.

 

Business Ethics

Friday, May 12th, 2017 at 4:30 pm by Dan Musick

Business Ethics:

A Comment on Matthew Stewart’s article “The B-School Boondoggle”

In the April 22-23, 2017 issue of The Wall Street Journal, Matthew Stewart reviews Duff McDonald’s recent book, The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite.

In this work, McDonald examines the history of Harvard Business School (HBS) and its damaging effect upon business management in America in his summary of a few of the business theories that “populate the promiscuous intellectual history of the (HBS).”

Stewarts affirms McDonald’s claim that none of them should be taken seriously. Stewart provides two reasons and implies a third: “First…they all start and end with the belief in a magic measuring stick that will reduce the problems of human collaboration to a game of numbers…second is that they always, always, justify the power and the glory of management. Did I mention the money?”

In his book, McDonald emphasizes a commitment to “the pursuit of corporate donations and consulting contracts” early in its history rather than genuinely pursuing knowledge. Meanwhile, HBS hails corporate managers as “the moral center of modern civilization.” Such a commitment and pedagogical strategy has encouraged the development of a market stocked with managers who possess little to no moral conscience and who justify criminal practices because they – being the corporate managers – determine morality.

Stewart’s article documents disturbing examples of corporate managers whose business practices and lifestyles demonstrate the effect of this commitment by HBS. This is not to blame HBS with all of the problems present in American society. However, such an approach has certainly not encouraged ethical behavior within the business sector where the greedy take and others suffer loss.

Our experience at DDM Garage Doors confirms the dark side of McDonald’s study. In recent years our website and YouTube tutorials company have suffered countless attacks. To cut corners thousands of unscrupulous companies and individuals have stolen images and text from our website. In addition to this, one greedy competitor has used click farms to drag down the ratings on our more popular YouTube tutorials such as our “How to Replace Garage Door Torsion Springs” video as well as videos of other competitors. As a result a substantial portion of our annual budget is spent on legal work to protect our intellectual property.

That’s the moral landscape of American Business. Harvard Business School’s contribution to it is an American tragedy. Thank you, Matt, and thank you, Duff, for helping us see our failures.

(Written by Daryle Worley with comments from Dan Musick)