Torsion Spring Cone Replacement

"Hi Mr Dan you had save me a lot of trouble. I tried to remove the torsion spring cone last night with all my tools include hack saw, blow torch,hamer,ect.. It took me 4 hour to remove it. I was so tired, this morning you sent me the picture of “how the cone should be remove”.It took me 2 minutes to get both off. I was so happy how easy it is, thank you very much for your help. Now everything is working fine. I had learned alot on your web site and Richard kinch web site. The next time, I will not be any trouble. Once again ,Thank you very much for your support and say HI to Jean for me."
-Andy Nguyen (01-19-07)

We have many customers who ask about how to replace the cones in each end of the torsion springs. The first time I did it 28 years ago it took me at least 2 hours. Hopefully these instructions will help you avoid the same sweat and strain.

In addition, torsion springs with the cones already installed cost about $10 more than the springs without cones. This extra amount can be pocketed or invested in longer life springs.

At one end of the spring is the winding cone; at the other end is the stationary cone. We will begin with the stationary cone.

First, install the bolts and nuts from the spring anchor bracket in the stationary cone as pictured here.


Next, grip both nuts in a vise.


The third step is the critical one for removing the spring from the cone. Hook the end of the spring wire with a pipe wrench or large channel locks, and turn the wrench until the spring comes off the cone.


If you do not have a vise, position the spring on the floor and place a bar between the bolts. Hook the end of the spring wire with the pipe wrench, and lift up on the winding bar while pushing down on the end of the wrench. Repeat this process until the cone is loose.

To remove the winding cone secure the cone in the vise, hook the end of the wire and turn the wire off the cone in the same manner. If you do not have a vise, use the same procedure above, with the only difference being that you will insert the bar into the winding cone.


After removing the cones and before installing the new springs on the cones, remove any oil that may be on the cones.


The next step is to reinstall the cones in the springs. This can be done in a vise, but I have always found it easier to do this with the springs and cones on the shaft.

To install the cones begin by turning each spring onto the cones by hand. Next, grip the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th coils from each end with the pipe wrench or large channel locks. You will need to adjust your pipe wrench a couple times to get a good grip on the spring.

Press the spring into the mouth of the jaws of the wrench with your thumb, and rest the other end of the wrench on the top of the door. Next, pull down on the winding cone with a winding bar. Continue reinserting the bar and pulling down on the winding cone until the cone is all the way in the end of the spring.


Since most cones are dual threaded, be sure the end of the spring wire follows the proper grooves on each cone. This tends to be more difficult with smaller wire such as the .207, .218 and .225. It may be necessary to tap the end of the wire into the proper groove of the cone.


At the stationary ends grip the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th coils from each end with the pipe wrench and pull down on the pipe wrench and carefully turn each spring onto the cones. Loosen the spring anchor bolts as needed to allow the coils to wind onto the cones.


If the spring won’t wind onto the cone when pulling down on the wrench, it is probably because the springs are on the wrong sides of the center bracket. Check the details at our Torsion Spring Replacement Page, especially step 71.