Dan's Garage Door Blog

Sales Help Wanted

Friday, March 2nd, 2018 at 6:26 pm by Dan Musick

DDM Garage Doors in West Chicago, Illinois is growing, and we need someone to help customers in the United States and around the world get parts for their garage doors and dock equipment.

Job Description

  • Help customers get the parts they need via phone, email, fax and local purchases.
  • Prepare and file written quotes including shipping over the road and international shipping.
  • Provide technical support for mechanical, electric, and hydraulic equipment, as well as for weather seals.
  • Provide solutions for parts used in special applications.
  • Resolve customer complaints regarding orders, delivery, damage, and returns.
  • Interface with operations, website production, purchasing, and warehouse.
  • Help manage customer records.
  • Help with a variety of tasks.

Qualifications

  • High mechanical ability. You may have a high mechanical aptitude even if you have never fixed anything. We suggest you try this mechanical aptitude test. Just click the appropriate link.
  • Curious about how things work
  • Detailed and organized
  • Honest
  • Ability to follow instructions
  • High school education
  • Excellent speaking and writing skills
  • Ability to manage emails and other communications
  • Internet proficient
  • Word and spreadsheet proficient
  • Ability to multi-task in a fast-paced environment
  • Hard working and motivated
  • Ability to create solutions for a wide variety of applications

More information about our company is on our blog titled “Who are We?”

If interested, please contact us.

How to Replace TorqueMaster One Springs

Friday, February 23rd, 2018 at 7:11 pm by Dan Musick

This week we posted our new TorqueMaster Spring Replacement video on YouTube.

This was created to use in conjunction with our written Wayne Dalton TorqueMaster Torsion Spring Replacement instructions with pictures and animated gifs.

It took a while, but I believe the quality was worth the wait. Do-it-yourselfers can now watch the video and determine if they want to buy TorqueMaster Springs and replace them without having to pay, in some cases, outrageous fees to have an outside contractor do the work.

I wrote the script, and Chris David shot and edited the video. Way to go, Chris!

We spent a lot of time showing how to remove the plastic liner from the tube. Over the years this has been a problem with many of our customers.

At DDM Garage Doors we wish those of you who view the video all the best.

 

New Products: Shaft and Strut Kits for New Shipping Restrictions

Friday, February 16th, 2018 at 6:33 pm by Dan Musick

In my January 19 blog, I explained the changes FedEx and UPS had made for shipping boxes that are over eight feet long. One inch of extra length would cost more than six times as much to ship.

Last week I showed a solution for shipping garage door seals to accommodate products that are over eight feet long.

This week we are showing a way to serve customers who need steel shafts and struts that normally ship in boxes over eight feet. The solution: Junction Kits.

Above you see one of our Shaft Junction Kits from our garage door shafts and couplers page that will fit into boxes that are less than eight feet long. This SH-011-16K Shaft Kit will allow us to ship a shaft for a 16′ wide door in boxes that are less than eight feet long.

Another new product is our Strut Kit. We had earlier developed strut junction kits that are available on our garage door struts page. Pictured above is our strut kit for nine foot wide doors. We have also developed these for wider Clopay doors.

A New Day in Shipping :-) Part 2

Friday, February 9th, 2018 at 7:01 pm by Dan Musick

Many years ago I learned an important lesson about life: “When life gives you a lemon, make lemonade.”  A similar expression I heard elsewhere is that “opportunities often come disguised as problems.” The lemon – or the problem – is the change in shipping lengths for garage door parts, in particular, our garage door seals.

On our other blog titled “A New Day in Shipping 🙁” I explained the extra cost of shipping packages over 96 inches. Until this year a higher cost was attached to packages over 108 inches, but now a much higher cost is applied to packages with lengths from 96 to 108 inches.

In the door industry, many of our products are eight feet long and the extra half inch or so of cardboard padding multiplies the shipping cost five or six-fold.

I ran this by Andrew, our sales manager /operations coordinator a few months ago and together we have come up with a solution for homeowners so they don’t have to pay the exorbitant shipping fees for eight foot or longer products, in particular, the weatherstripping. The solution is cutting and gluing.

Super glue is super for garage door seals. Many of our seals are made with a hard PVC that can bond in less than a minute. We recommend the gel type because it stays where you squirt it. It will also bond the flexible part of the seal, but it does tend to stiffen. That won’t normally be a problem, but if it does we recommend the E6000 glue.

The E6000 glue bonds the vinyl well, especially on the soft twin contact bottom seals. The major consideration with this glue is that it can take a day or so to dry and bond. You will need to leave your garage door partially open for up to two days.

Here is an example of how the products look when they have been glued. On the lighter color, a little calk or filler might help with aesthetics.

 

 

Introducing Ray Bansal – Phoenix / Scottsdale / Tempe, AZ Doors

Friday, January 26th, 2018 at 6:43 pm by Dan Musick

Over the years I’ve had the privilege of personally training men to repair residential and commercial garage doors and openers, along with steel rolling doors and dock levelers.

This week I had the honor of training a true tradesman and businessman, Ray Bansal. He hails from England and he began as a software man, but he prefers hands-on business. Over a number of years, he built and ran a glass company. He sold that business and later built and sold an entrance door company.

Now he’s beginning a third venture – selling, installing and servicing all types of doors and dock equipment.

He scored very high on the mechanical test we give, and he demonstrated extremely quick learning, often running ahead of me in my instruction. Training him was a real joy; I threw everything at him and he soaked it up like a sponge. He’s as agile as a 20-year-old.

He’s honest and hardworking. Unlike many professionals who charge the customers for their learning, Ray understands that with every business there is a learning curve, and he will not bill that to the customer. That has been my philosophy over the decades, and that sense of fairness is not common.

The name of his company is Prostar Doors. In coming days you’ll find his site at www.prostardoors.com. Until then you can reach him on his cell phone at 408-210-4780. He gets a lot of spam calls just as I do, so if he doesn’t answer, I would recommend leaving a message.

Tell him you read about him on Dan’s blog, and wish him all success in his new business.

I am expecting great things of you, Ray! May God bless you as you serve your many customers in the Phoenix, Tempe, and Scottsdale area.

 

A New Day in Shipping :-(

Friday, January 19th, 2018 at 6:23 pm by Dan Musick

It appears that UPS and FedEx no longer want to ship boxes that are over eight feet long.

As of January 2018 boxes that are eight feet or longer have surcharges attached to the shipping costs.

The following is an example of the exorbitant surcharges. If a 4″ X 4″ box weighing 10 pounds is shipped by UPS from our zip code to one of our suppliers at 43447, and if the dimension is 96″ long, or eight feet even, the cost is $24.36.

If we increase the length one inch, shipping for the 10-pound box is billed at the 90-pound rate of $154.35, which is more than six times the amount just for the extra inch.

WOW! What an unprecedented opportunity for smart entrepreneurs to step up and cash in on this market niche. Please call us when you get your business up and running!

Tips for Ordering PowerMaster Operators

Friday, January 12th, 2018 at 6:09 pm by Dan Musick

Ordering the correct PowerMaster Operators can be simple if you begin with the correct details. Here is what you’ll need in order to order one of our hoist operators.

  1. Voltage. These are normally 115, 208-230, and 460 volts. Check the voltage on your existing operator or the voltage readily available in the building.
  2. Phase. The 115-volt operators are all single phase; the 208-230-volt are either single or three phase; the 460-volt operators are all three phase.
  3. Horsepower. If you are replacing an existing operator, and if that operator worked fine, you can replace the operator with the same horsepower. If you are installing an operator where there was not one before, you can check our horsepower chart to determine the best operator for your application.
  4. Height. This is needed to determine the hand chain length. Measure from the floor to the center of the operator. On standard lift doors this dimension is usually the same as the door height. On vertical lift and high lift doors the operator will be mounted higher.
  5. Shaft Diameter and Key Size. Most sectional doors use one-inch shafts with 1/4″ keys. Steel rolling doors use a variety of shaft sizes and key sizes.
  6. Mounting Side. As you look at the door from inside the building, determine the side on which the operator is mounted. The drive chain is mounted closer to the door and the hand chain is mounted further from the door. On sectional doors you can normally install the operator on either side, but on steel rolling doors the operator can be installed only on the drive side.
  7. Steel Rolling Door Mounting. If your door rolls up around itself like a window shade, there are a variety ways to mount the operator. Let us know how you plan to mount the operator; it needs to be built to fit your framing. This Steel Rolling Door Ordering Sheet should help.
  8. Special Situations. Please advise of any special situations such as space limitations, center mounting, international voltages and cycles, special accessories needed, and whether the operator needs to be water-proof or explosion-proof.

Way to Go FedEx!

Friday, January 5th, 2018 at 9:18 pm by Dan Musick

Image result for fedex

We had hit a quagmire in synchronizing our shopping cart with FedEx website. I told our customer service rep, Kevin Kedzior, about the problem. It seemed insurmountable. In just a few days he brought over two of FedEx’s top software guns, Justin Cagney and Ed Cohen. An hour later all the pieces of the puzzle were aligned.

Just as the best vioinists make their performances seem effortless, so Kevin and his associates made the impossible look like a cake walk. That’s the mark of true professionals.

Way to go, Kevin! Keep up the superb work!

Christmas: What Child is This?

Monday, December 25th, 2017 at 1:49 pm by Dan Musick

The gospel of John opens with these words: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. In verse 14 John continues: “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth.”

John writes these words after having 60 or so years to reflect on Who Jesus was. To showcase the eternal Deity of our beloved Christmas baby, John parallels his opening words with the opening words of Scripture: “In the beginning God . . .” and here, “In the beginning was the Word . . .”

Both God and the Word are eternal; they have existed from the beginning. Moses writes in Psalm 90:2, “Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever You had formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, You are God.”

In verse one John distinguishes the Word from God: “the Word was with God.”

But he also equates the two: “the Word was God.”

What is the relationship between the Word and God?

John provides the answer in verse 14: “The Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth.”

We see here that Jesus is “the only begotten of the Father.” Jesus was begotten from the beginning, before time.

But we also see here in verse 14 that Jesus, the Word, eternal God – “became flesh.” This is the incarnation, this is Christmas!

The angel Gabriel had told Mary: “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Highest will overshadow you; therefore, also, that Holy One who is to be born will be called the Son of God.” (Luke 1:35) In Matthew we read that He is also called Immanuel, God with us. (Matthew 1:23)

Jesus was begotten of God before time, and in time he was begotten of the virgin Mary.

These truths are reflected in our historic creeds and in our church’s statement of faith.

In the documents of Nicaea (325) we read: “We believe in one God, the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible. And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, Very God of Very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father, by Whom all things were made.”

The later Creed of Chalcedon (451) builds on the story of Mary’s visit with Elizabeth to help define Christ’s human and divine natures. When visiting Mary, Elizabeth correctly recognized that the baby she was carrying in her womb was God. Elizabeth asks: “But why is this granted to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?” (Luke 1:43) A favorite Christmas song asks, “Mary did you know?” But from Scripture we know what Mary knew. She begins with these words: “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit has rejoiced in God my Savior.” Question: was Mary looking up to heaven in praise to God, or was she looking down?

Here are some of the words from the Creed of Chalcedon that distinguish us as Christians: “We declare that in His Divinity, He was begotten of the Father before time, and in His humanity He was begotten in this last age of Mary, the virgin, the mother of God, for us and our salvation. We declare that the one selfsame Christ, only begotten Son and Lord, must be acknowledged in two natures, without any co-mingling, or change or division or separation, that the distinction between their natures is in no way removed by their union, but rather, that the specific character of each nature is preserved, and they are united in one person.”

In the Creed of Athanasius, the Trinitarian Creed, we read: “The Father is not made by anyone, nor created by anyone, nor generated by anyone. The Son is not made nor created, but he is generated by the Father alone. The Holy Spirit is not made nor created nor generated, but proceeds from the Father and the Son. . .” And the words continue: “We believe and profess that our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is both God and man. As God He was begotten of the substance of the Father before time; as man He was born in time of the substance of His Mother.”

In my church’s statement of faith we affirm:

“We believe that the eternally existent Word of God, Jesus Christ, is God’s only begotten Son, The Second Person of the Trinity, and who was conceived by the Holy Spirit. Jesus Christ was born of a virgin, lived a sinless life, performed miracles and His teachings are truth. He is fully God and fully man, possessing both deity and humanity united in one person, without division of the person or confusion of the two natures.”

God assumed a human body. The infinite, transcendent, omnipotent, creator God became a finite, helpless, creature without ceasing in any way to remain fully God: omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent.

What a Child This is!!!

(All scripture references are from the NKJV)

How to Replace the Bottom Rollers on Garage Doors

Friday, December 15th, 2017 at 6:59 pm by Dan Musick

The most dangerous part of replacing garage door rollers is replacing the bottom rollers. The bottom fixture not only holds the roller, but the bottom of the cable is secured to the bottom fixture. Tension from the spring pulls on the cable making removal of the bottom fixture extremely dangerous.

Several years ago we posted a YouTube video titled “How to Replace Your Garage Door Rollers.” In the video we showed a way to bend the tracks to replace all the rollers, including the bottom rollers. However, some people prefer not to bend the tracks. In a recent email exchange, William S. of Las Vegas shared his ideas on how to replace the bottom rollers without bending the tracks. Since the topic was fresh on my mind, I decided to post this blog.

For safety it is best to replace the bottom roller on one side at a time.

First, open the door and mark the bottom of the track where it meets the garage floor.

Next, remove the track bolts and nuts that secure the track to the track brackets.

There are normally two or three track brackets, or jamb brackets on each vertical track.

Now, remove the two nuts that secure the top of the track to the flag bracket. Check to make sure the bottom of the door is above the top of the vertical track.

Now that the fasteners are removed you can now remove the vertical track.

Carefully pull down on the bottom of the door until the bottom roller clears the bottom of the flag bracket.

At this point you can remove the old roller and install the new one.

To complete the job simply reverse the steps above, and then go to the other side of the door to replace the other roller.

 

Unmatched Support. The Right Part. DIY with Confidence!